real science for today's homeschooler

Using Popcorn to Practice Scientific Method

Using Popcorn to Practice Scientific Method

This is a fairly common science fair project that I actually helped my grandson carry out for an elementary science fair. It’s definitely not a new idea, but a great way to let children work through the scientific method using a fun topic . . . POPCORN! The question to be answered is: “Does storage temperature affect how well popcorn pops?” Children will be storing popcorn in a warm environment, room temperature, cold, and frozen. Before beginning the experiment, encourage students to make a Hypothesis. Ask them to decide which storage method they think will work best, and why.

Materials: large bag of loose popcorn (not the individual “flavored” bags), baggies, paper lunch sacks, access to a microwave

Here’s the procedure we used, but it’s important to let your child come up with the procedure if this is to be a scientific method experiment.

1. Put 100 popcorn kernels in a plastic baggie and label as “warm.” Repeat with 3 more baggies, labeling them as “room temperature,” “cold,” “frozen.”

2. Place the baggies in the appropriate area. For example, store the “warm” bag under an electric blanket, the “room temperature” bag in the pantry, the “cold” bag in the refrigerator, and the “frozen” bag in the freezer. Select a specific time for storage, such as a week, a month, etc.

3. After the storage time is complete, remove the bags from their storage area at the same time. To test the storage methods, divide out the 100 popcorn kernels between 5 paper lunch sacks, with 20 kernels in each bag. Label each paper sack with the appropriate storage method. Repeat with all the remaining popcorn, being sure to label each paper sack with the correct storage method!

4. Decide on a specific popping time. Somewhere around 2 minutes works best, but any time will work if it gives the popcorn time to pop and you keep the time the same for all trials.

5. Put one of each sack of popcorn into the microwave at the same time. (In other words, place one sack that contains popcorn stored as “warm,” one sack with “cold” popcorn, etc. Turn on the microwave for the specified time. After the time has elapsed, remove the bags and count the number of kernels that popped. Record. Repeat until all the popcorn has been tried.

Data: Here’s a sample data table that can be used to record the results. For older children you may want to let them design their own table.

  Trial 1 Trial 2 Trial 3 Trial 4 Trial 5 Average
warm            
room            
cold            
frozen            

 

Older children can find the average of each type. For younger children who may not understand the concept of averaging, change to “Total” for the last column.

Analysis: Younger children can compare the totals to see which storage method resulted in more popped kernels. Older children can graph the results for a visual representation.

Conclusion: Have students state out loud, or write down, which storage method produced the most popped popcorn. Why do they think this method worked best? Also have them refer back to their original hypothesis. Was their hypothesis right or wrong?

HINT: Based on experience, don’t try to pop one bag at a time in the microwave. There will not be enough water in the popcorn to absorb the microwaves and the appliance will overheat! Mine actually stopped working for awhile! Popping four bags at a time worked well for us, but do feel the sides of the microwave after the first round to make sure it isn’t overheating. Take breaks between rounds if needed.

ALTERNATE METHODS: Children can also come up with their own idea of what to test, such as light vs dark, storage time, type of storage container, etc. The more children are able to make the experiment their own, the better!

BACKGROUND: Depending on the age of your child, You may also want to have them research WHY popcorn pops. Here’s a great website that explains the science of popcorn, as well as some interesting history: http://www.popcorn.org/Facts-Fun/What-Makes-Popcorn-Pop.

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Teaching Kids about Consumerism and Conservation

Teaching Kids about Consumerism and Conservation

Let’s face it, the advertising world targets your kids every day. What child hasn’t been disappointed after saving for months for a toy, only to find it doesn’t measure up to what the commercial promised? In my science classes I teach my students how science can be used to objectively test claims made by advertisers . . . in other words, how to be wise consumers. Here’s a fun idea that actually came from one of my students. It combines a lesson about consumerism, along with a lesson about conservation.

Design an experiment to test which is more cost efficient, using disposable or rechargeable batteries. I’ll list some of the variables to consider below, but your child can easily design this experiment themselves for some hands on practice using the scientific method.

1. Pick comparable battery brands to test. If you pick a name brand disposable battery, don’t compare it to a cheap store brand rechargeable, etc.
2. Use the same size battery of each type.
3. Test the battery life in the same way. An example would be using the battery to run any small electronic device. Measure the time the device remains in operation. Use the same device for both types of batteries, and keep the device under the same conditions (temperature, volume, etc.)
4. Decide on exactly what you’re comparing. Are you comparing the amount of time each battery will keep the device running? If so, you may want to also test different brands of each type. Are you trying to determine which type (disposable vs rechargeable) battery costs less in the long run? In that case, you’ll need to also factor in how many times the rechargeable can be recharged vs how many disposable batteries would have to be purchased to get the same result.

Again, those are just some suggestions of things to consider when designing the experiment. Your child will have plenty of ideas of their own. Gently guide them into using the scientific method to design their experiment so their results are valid.

Extensions of this lab are limitless! Older students can research the amount of waste produced by batteries or the amount of nonrenewable resources are used in the manufacturing of batteries. Find battery commercials or ads for the different brands and types tested. Challenge students to evaluate the claims made by the manufacturers based on the results of their experiment. This will usually lead to a discussion about the accuracy of claims made about other products. Encourage your child to select several products that are commonly used in your home and put them to the test! Teaching kids not to believe everything they see and hear from the media, and teaching them that they have the power to evaluate these claims for themselves is a valuable life lesson!

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